Edinburgh Christmas Gin

So next up is an act which is very comfortable providing a lot of gifts and variety and if your need lots of gifts Edinburgh Gin have box sets of all their products for every Gin lover.

Just came up with a new hastag #Ginglealltheway 

It might be rubbish.

So EG have launched their Christmas Gin (again).

If you have not seen or tried it, think of mulled wine but doing something similar for Gin.

The Christmas Gin is flavoured with an special Yuletide botanicals, which is essentially added the normal London Dry EG.  By Christmassy we mean, frankincense and myrrh and classic juniper, this makes for a warming gin either to sip or mix with.

To nose and taste, Rich aromatics include zesty sweet orange, while a finishing note of nutmeg adds comforting yuletide warmth.
The Gin is Bottled at 43% ABV and can be enjoyed as a G&T with orange garnish, Or a Christmas Negroni, the sweet myrrh providing balance to Campari’s bitter finish.
Thank you Edinburgh gun website there.

https://www.edinburghgin.com/our-gins/christmas-gin
Thanks

Graeme 

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Juniper Festival – Take Two

I like how the greatest debate I have in writing most things is weather or not to type like a teenager texting or try and be exact, knowing full well that the dyslexia will creep in at some point.   In this blog it was whether to use the word two or 2.  First word problems (the other problem being my incapable ability at proof reading).

So Juniper Festival has been and gone.  A massive well done to all the organisers and the brands for standing up for hours on end pouring and repeating the same words over and over.

We (me Graeme) went along in a working capacity and dragged my lovely wife along for good measure (still strange saying that).  I should point out that my wife Rachel gets drunk on one drink and hasn’t had a proper drink in three months.

I always forget how long the walk is to the SWG is from the bus route road.  Should have ditched the car tbh.  We arrived, got signed in and heading straight for the first faces we knew.  Edinburgh Gin.  Where we lined our stomachs with all the Gin liqueurs.  And no this was not abuse of power or stealing.  We were furthering our knowledge.  Always great to see the EG folks.  They do have the products down to a tee, luring your in with sugary Gin crack (the liqueurs) then building you up to the Cannonball.


Then we seen the smiling enthused face of Sam from Minus33.  Another one of our regular favs.  We got to catch the end of Sam telling some nice people about how it’s low calorie.  Then he made us two cocktails of the pink variety.  Btw I seem to pick all the effeminate drinks.  We also need to get that recipe off Sam.


Shouldn’t really list all the people we spoke too.  Next was Makar, where we stuck our hands deep in juniper berries.  Then to catch up with Claire from Summerhouse Drinks who deals in the wonderful Walter Gregors Tonic (Walter Macgregor if your a teuchter).


After visiting lots of other gins, like Darnleys, Strathearn, Daffys, No3 London and Sipsmiths.  It was time for our first talk which incidentally was Sipsmiths.  Where we learned some new facts, the swam in Sipsmiths signifies the still and the “Swans neck” at the top.  Straight back out to the floor together more booze.  First stop Pickerings (no Paul), but the main man himself.  The wife is a big fan of Pickerings, me too.  The old recipe (the orange top).


We then met (again) Alfonso from Valentia Gin, we can safely say that he is one of the locusts Gin Reps we’ve ever met.  Going to try sort that Gin for Gin Club as it tastes amazing.

Last talk of the night, hosted by David from Makar.  Good patter from David as always, good to learn about the relationship between Makar and Loch Fyne, also good to taste the cocktail topped with Loch Fyne Salmon.

It’s fair to say that it was a good night with lots of Gin drunk.  There were a few gins we didn’t even get to which we wish we had.

Long walk home where we we’re nearly tempted into the Park bar by some lovely ladies from Ireland and Harris.  We resisted, taxis for Macdonald’s then beans on toast.  In from a Saturday night by 11pm.  Amazing.

Septembers Gin Club

Right I know this is late as always.  It’s fair to say we have been mental (Moich – if you’re from Perthshire), but here goes.

So who decided that Graeme should get married head to Sri Lanka for three weeks and on the week he came back should do a Gin Club.  He did (should I say I did), twat!  That’s a sure fire way to ruin yourself.  Where was Caldow you ask, “Busy” ahaha.  Nonsense, he doesn’t know the meaning of it.  Ticketmaster sounds easy J

So Septembers Gin club was an interesting one (they all are).  We had one left field choice (which we will describe later), a choice to allow the Gin Clubbers to reach for something a bit more special when buying a standard London Dry other than Gordon’s or Bombay and a new one which tasted like the seaside.

So the first Gin we featured is one which currently has a bit of a PR problem, and this is a crying shame.

Plymouth Gin

The name Plymouth Gin is a protected brand, much like Scotch Whiskey (in that it has to come from certain casks and be made here) or Jersey potatoes which have to be made in Jersey.  It’s actually one of few Gins which have a protected name.

Plymouth Gin is essentially a London Dry in taste with a slight degree of difference that most wouldn’t taste once they fire in garnish and tonic, but as it’s made traditionally in Plymouth it gets its own Gin type, Plymouth Gin and not London Dry.

Back in the day when Plymouth was a famous naval town seeing the likes of Nelson et al there were over eight distilleries catering and facilitating the term “drinks like a sailor”, now though there is only one.

Plymouth is produced by the Black Friars Distillery. The Black Friars Distillery is the only remaining gin distillery in Plymouth, in what was once a Dominican Order monastery built in 1431, the distillery being one of the UK’s eldest in UK, dating back to 1793.

The Brand has so much history and is such a great tasting Gin for the house that I’m constantly annoyed it gets bypassed by most in pubs or the supermarket and people opt for Gordon’s or Bombay thinking its better.  The brand really has an image problem.  But Barman love it, it’s a great cocktail dry Gin, it tastes great in the home and for some reason Morrison’s always has it on special so you can get an amazing dry Gin for the same price as Bombay or a big bottle of Gordon’s.

It has seven botanicals – juniper, coriander, sweet orange, cardamom, angelica and orris root that are redistilled with pure grain spirit. For a Gin you don’t get the dominance of Juniper instead its almost sweet, with orange and cardamom giving it a soft fruity yet spicy finish.

Please reach for this instead of your traditional choices.  Plymouth should be in your drinks cabinet or globe J

We served it as G&T served with Fever Tree, garnished with Strawberry

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Edinburgh Seaside

So we have featured Edinburgh before and we can safely say the first time when they brought the Cannonball and we made Dry Martini’s along with bottles of all their other products, it was a pretty ruckus night.  Caldow had to carry women out in cuddieback form.

Edinburgh Gin has been constant innovators in the world of Scottish Gin.  For some time the Gin was bottled down south but in summer 2014 Edinburgh Gin move the distillation process to the capital.  The Edinburgh Gin range is rather impressive with Raspberry Gin (which we have been told are Rasps from Perthshire) and Elderflower Gin (and other flavoured gins); we featured the Cannonball Gin in February, this time though we are using the Edinburgh Seaside Gin.

Head Distiller David Wilkinson and the team scowered the coastline in search of the perfect ingredients to give a Scottish seaside flavour. After experimentation, they settled on a combination of seaweed, scurvy grass and ground ivy combined to the other Edinburgh Gin Botanicals making a slightly sweet yet refreshingly minerally taste, you can taste the salt.

We at Gin Club think this is the best thing they have made.  It is a truly unique product.  I know they have a huge product list, but the liqueurs are more like Gin Crack…  As in “here come and try this” to get you into it.  They are great and in fairness Mrs Macdonald drinks them all the time, but the Seaside is their best innovated Gin to date.  Well done Mr Wilkinson.

Thanks to Finlay and Ruairidh for popping down and the patter, and drinking hehe, no ruined Gin Clubbers from the mini still this time.

We served it as a G&T with Fever Tree, but to get the most out of it you should use the Mediterranean Tonic and a lemon peel twist.

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Whitley Neill

So we have Mr Niell before but this goes along the same lines and the Plymouth choice.  It’s in all the supermarkets and the usual retail price is £22-£25 which is around the same as Bombay, please pick this more (unless of course Bombay email Gin Club tomorrow saying “please promote us here’s eight bottles”).

Whitley Neill is distilled near Birmingham, in an antique copper pot still called ‘Constance’ who is over 100 years old. Using exceptionally pure water along with nine botanicals, which are carefully selected to ensure that they are of the highest quality. Whitley Neill’s tagline is “Made in London and Inspired by Africa” which is not only an insight to its creator Johnny Neill who is married to an African woman but also describes some of the botanical choices. In this line up are cape gooseberries and baobab fruit along with more traditional ones such as juniper, coriander, lemon & orange peel, angelica root, cassia bark and orris root.

To taste you get juniper and citrus notes first followed by a subtle spice and complex finish. It really does not disappoint on the “different” quote as you do get more than you normally get from a London Dry.

We served it as a G&T served with Fever Tree, garnished with Plum.

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Firkin Gin

So I mentioned earlier about our left field choice.  By this I’m not saying “this is our crap option” quite the opposite it’s the different choice, by different I mean greatly different (not sure if I’m showing different in a good light here or not).

FIRKIN Gin was launched in April 2015 by Gleann Mor Spirit Company.  Gleann Mor are mainly a Whiskey company, this is their successful Gin experiment.  Firkin Gin has a distinct whiskey look from the American oak whisky casks, it is rested in.  I really need to learn more about the brand and the history of Gleann Mor Spirits, they seem to have a great foot hold in the rare bottled Whiskey world.  Yum yum yum.  Gleann Mor, feel free to bring some along J

It really confused my senses at first.  As when you crack open the bottle you think “ohh Whiskey” but it’s not, it just looks and at first smells like one.  We served it with Tonic and orange peel which was wrong, completely wrong.  Yeah it worked for some, but as soon as you swapped the tonic for ginger beer or ale and the orange peel.  Different drink altogether.  Like Jerry Maguire “you complete me” says the Firkin to Ginger.  So much more was gained from the ginger combination.

The ingredients are a traditional line up with juniper, coriander seed, angelica root, and orris root all added into the still.  The Gin is 4 times distilled and bottled at 46%.  There is a good hit of juniper on the nose, followed by mint and lemon peel, then lemon barley sweetness develops followed by flint and elderflower;  a lovely balance between sweetness and crisp aromas.  On the palate, fudge-like sweetness with clean eucalyptus, then more mint.

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Right so that was the round up from last week.

Some thanks to Firkin (FIRKIN), to Whitley Neill, Plymouth and Edinburgh Gin.

Thanks to the Tea Room for the cakes, which we will get the recipe and post btw.

Thanks to Blonde Bridget for the vegan, and all other allergen cake.

Thanks for coming.

Septembers Gin’s – FIRKIN & Edinburgh Seaside

So this month we are doing something a bit different.

The main reason being Stuart and myself have been busy as hell the whole of September and we haven’t had a chance to do the blogs the same, hence all the “ghost blog” posts for the Great British Bake Off.  But that will happen when you gallivant off on something called Honeymoon.

Right so this time we are doing the blogs in reverse order, we usually do a blog for each featured Gin, then post a small blog about how we served it after it.  But we are doing the latter first.

So our first two Gins for This month are:

FIRKIN

FIRKIN Gin was launched in April 2015 by Gleann Mor Spirit Company.  Before progressing any further Gleann Mor are mainly a Whiskey company, they specialise in bottling rare whiskeys.  This is the Gleann Mor distilleries foray into Gin and can I just start by saying brilliant start folks.  So Frikin Gin has a distinct whiskey look, it is golden brown and this is caused by the American oak whisky casks, it is rested in.

The ingredients are a traditional line up with juniper, coriander seed, angelica root, and orris root all added into the still.  The Gin is 4 times distilled and bottled at 46%.  There is a good hit of juniper on the nose, followed by mint and lemon peel, then lemon barley sweetness develops followed by flint and elderflower;  a lovely balance between sweetness and crisp aromas.  On the palate, fudge-like sweetness with clean eucalyptus, then more mint.

I find the Gin straight better than in a G&T as it gives a good mix of Juniper and Toffee type flavors.  To me tonic takes the Juniper away however, for Gin Club we are keeping the tonic or possibly attempting another mixer.  Trust me the flavor wont be lost, I think I have drank too much Gin now so Juniper gets lost unless its above 40% 🙂

Serving Suggestion: G&T served with Fever Tree, garnished Orange peel (maybe Ginger beer)

firkin

EDINBURGH SEASIDE

Edinburgh Gin have been constant innovators in the world of Scottish Gin.  For some time the Gin was bottled down south but in summer 2014 Edinburgh Gin move the distillation process to the capital.

The Edinburgh Gin range is rather impressive with Raspberry Gin (which we have been told are Rasps from Perthshire) and Elderflower Gin (and other flavoured gins), we featured the Cannonball Gin in February, this time though we are using the Edinburgh Seaside Gin.

Head Distiller David Wilkinson and the team scowered the coastline in search of the perfect ingredients to give a Scottish seaside flavour. After experimentation, they settled on a combination of seaweed, scurvy grass and ground ivy combined to the other Edinburgh Gin Botanicals making a slightly sweet yet refreshingly minerally taste, you can taste the salt.

Its a really strange taste at first.  Its like when someone lets your try potatoes cooked in sea water.  Its strange but brilliant.  This is a truly unique approach to adding flavor to a spirit which inst just making it another fruit infused Gin.

Serving Suggestion: Served with Fever Tree Tonic (possibly Mediterranean Tonic) & lemon twist.

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Edinburgh Gin – Cannonball (Not Damian Rice)

EGD_circle_logo6 EG Cannonball

Our third Gin for the February Gin Club is the mighty company of Edinburgh Gin.  When looking for Gins to be involved in February we weren’t initially think about Edinburgh.  This is mainly because we could have done a whole gin club just on them, their product list seems to grow and grow.  For February’s Gin Club we are getting something rather special, they are bringing along the new Cannonball Gin – along with other goodies too.

Edinburgh Gin is part of Spencerfield Spirit Company and was launched in June 2010. Edinburgh Gin’s parent company – Spencerfield Spirit Co also have Sheep Dip and Pig’s Nose whiskies.

Now here comes the bit we at Gin Club debated for a long time, we always thought Edinburgh Gin was made in England and only bottled in Edinburgh, however…  For the first four years of its life it was made in England in a still called “Jenny”.   Then the spirit was shipped to Edinburgh and a selection of locally sourced and grown Scottish botanicals such as juniper berries, milk thistle, pine, heather were combined with the gin distillate from England, watered down and bottled.  But since summer 2014 the whole process now takes place in Edinburgh – thus ends the argument of Edinburgh Gins true origin.

The Edinburgh Gin range is rather impressive with Raspberry Gin (which we have been told are Rasps from Perthshire – hopefully Blairgowrie as Stuart and I have strict rules about the berries we eat as essentially our entire teenage years were paid for by working on the berries) and Elderflower Gin. And for us we will be using the strong “navy strength” stuff called Cannonball.

Edinburgh Gin has a full juniper hit (I keep saying this but Gins really should taste of Juniper) with heathery notes.  We haven’t tried the Cannonball yet though, I’m guessing it’s the same just stronger.  We might and I say might be making Martini’s for the evening which I want to call Mongs Meg Martini’s (doubtful if this will stick though).